Christians, it’s time to stop picking bad fruit from a bad tree.

  
I hope I start to see changes in how many American Christians talk about LGBTQ people and equality issues. Because if you tell us that you’re sorry for our suffering today, but go back to opposing our rights and demeaning us for being LGBTQ tomorrow, then your words of love are empty and pointless. If you falsely accuse trans people of putting you in danger in bathrooms but you don’t work to stop the REAL violence we face every day, then you are a hypocrite.

You must reevaluate how you address LGBTQ issues. You MUST start accepting us, even if you personally still disagree with us. You can’t claim to care about me and still oppose legislation that would help protect me and those I love from violence and discrimination. You can’t claim to care about us when your anti-LGBTQ teachings are literally driving young people into depression and suicide at record rates, and encouraging people to see us as threats which results in violence. You don’t get to claim to be loving when you spread misinformation about us that puts us in even more danger. Many Christians believe in sin, but they don’t expect non-believers to follow their religion’s standards and they don’t put us down for it or fight our legal equality. This I understand and can even respect. But you have NO RIGHT to expect anyone else to live by your religion’s standards, or to socially punish people for not conforming to your personal ideas of morality and normality. It’s literally killing us, and has been for a very long time. But you don’t see it. You don’t want to see it. You want to see us as bad people who are persecuting you, instead of the other way around. 

  
You keep picking bad fruit off the tree and saying it’s a good tree. But the fruit of homophobia is pain and death. Why are you still watering a poisonous tree? 

Do I have to scream for you to hear me? Do I have to bleed for you to see me? Cause I grieve; you’re not listening to me. (A song from my Christian days. It seemed appropriate.)

Please don’t be silent.

  
You’ll post about us when you want to oppose our rights, but you won’t post to condemn those that massacred us. 
You’ll talk about how immoral you think we are, but you won’t tell us you care when we’re scared and hurting and facing increased risks of violence.
You’ll talk about how LGBTQ people are ruining *your* nation, but you won’t apologize for how your anti-gay attitudes have contributed to the violence and social oppression that we face every single day. 

You’ll pretend we don’t exist unless it fits your anti-LGBTQ agenda. We don’t exist unless you are putting us down or opposing our rights. We don’t exist unless you are preaching about our “debauchery” or accusing us of trying to ruin your lives. But when we suffer? Silence. It’s been the same exact pattern for decades. 

Whether it’s publicly or privately, show us that you acknowledge what happened to us and that you care. Pray if you want. But if that’s all you do, you’re not really helping. We can’t hear your prayers. We need solidarity and acceptance much more than prayers. We need to be acknowledged as human beings who didn’t deserve this. 

It can be as simple as “My prayers are with the LGBTQ community today. I’m so sorry that you were treated this way. Nobody should be murdered for who they are.” There! It’s that simple! Why is that so hard for so many Christians to say?! 

Perhaps it’s because they believe we deserved it, or it’s our own fault. Or perhaps it’s because they’ve finally realized that we, not them, are the ones who are actually being rampantly persecuted in the US, and they are too embarrassed to admit it. Perhaps it’s hard for them to support us because then they’d have to admit that they were wrong about the violence and oppression we face because of homophobia. Perhaps they’d rather be silent than admit they were wrong. 

Perhaps you have other reasons for being silent. But we need you to not be silent right now. It’s the worst thing you can do, aside from telling us that we deserved to be shot. Share a support meme or rainbow picture if you can’t get out the words. There are lots of ways to show solidarity even if you are grieving. Trust me, we know how hard it is. We live it all the time. If you can’t support us publicly, message us privately. 

This explains it well.

The LGBTQ community won’t be ok for a while, and that’s ok.

  
Please be patient and supportive of your LGBTQ loved ones right now. Many of us are angry, sad, scared, numb, frustrated, and/or grieving. We will each be processing our feelings about the attack in different ways. Some of us may not be ok for a while. Some will never be ok again. We may be less trusting and more angry for a while, and understandably so. 
Going forward, many of us will be fighting even harder for society to treat us with dignity. We may be asking our loved ones to get off the fence of neutrality and start standing up for us. We will be asking others to hear our stories, and to treat us with compassion and dignity. We will challenge homophobia even more because it is literally killing us. 
We need to stand together and not let this horrible act turn us against each other. We can’t change what happened, but we can choose how we respond to it.

Orlando Gay Club Shooting

  The worst shooting in US history was targeting a club full of gay people. While we don’t know his motives for sure yet, it’s possible that the shooter was a religious extremist and he was definitely homophobic. Homophobic people are already gleefully saying that this was “God’s work”. The shooter may have possibly been Muslim (we don’t know this for sure yet), but Christian extremists and other homophobic people are already applauding his actions. Even if he’s not a religious extremist himself, he’s revealed the violent natures of so many others in the US. 

Can you see why so many LGBTQ people live in fear? Why we are trying to get society to accept us? It’s about survival, not us pushing our “lifestyles” on you. When a minority group of people is not accepted by their culture at large, it makes them a target for violence and abuse, and it encourages terrorists like this to target them.
LGBTQ people face discrimination and violence all the time in the US, and from people in every belief system. Religious doctrines that condemn homosexuality or gender differences, plus rampant general social stigma against us, have resulted in a culture where LGBTQ people are regularly abused and targeted for violence. But many Americans don’t believe them because they aren’t personally affected by it. A mass shooting targeting a gay club is pretty hard to ignore though, isn’t it? 
I’m really glad I’m in Canada right now. The US scares me. It’s not a very safe place to be LGBTQ. 
My heart goes out to the victims and their families. I hope people of all beliefs come together to help them. 

Socially accepting the LGBTQ community is important.

  My artwork above.
We need society to accept LGBTQ people as normal. Not because we care about what other people think about us, or because we want others to become gay or to give up their beliefs, but because we are abused and mistreated and shot down in cold blood because so many people see us as immoral, disgusting, and deviant. Being treated as abnormal and immoral is not only hurtful and emotionally damaging, it is dangerous. 
When you say there is something wrong with us or that we are abominations, remember Orlando. 
When you say gay marriage or gender non-conformity will ruin our nation, remember Orlando. 
When you oppose our equal rights and are silent when we are bullied and oppressed, remember Orlando. 
Remember that hurtful and violent people will listen to what you say about us, and and they will always take it much farther than you intend. Your words against us are not harmless, even if your intentions are good. Are you encouraging them to love us, or fear us? Accept us as equals, or see us as threats to their way of life? 
Silence only benefits the people hurting us. Silence encourages their awful actions against us even more. How much violence and harm could be avoided if more people stood up for us when people put us down or mistreat us? 
It’s a shame that it takes a mass shooting for people to take the rampant oppression and violence against the LGBTQ community seriously. How many more of us have to suffer or die before people will put aside their judgements of our personal lives and stand by us as human beings? 

Thoughts on Syrian Refugees and Terrorist Attacks

It makes me so angry to hear so many people talk about refusing Syrian refugees because of their race or religion. Are we truly so calloused that we would let people suffer and die so we never have to face any risks or deal with inconveniences? Are we so selfish that we aren’t willing to share the freedom and safety we take for granted because those who need it are a little different than we are?

Not long ago, the US turned away Holocaust victims over similar concerns. This makes me sick to my stomach; I’ve seen the documentaries, I’ve heard the stories of the survivors, and what they faced is far beyond what most of us can imagine. People were sent back to suffer and die because of “security concerns”. Entire groups of refugees were denied rescue because of the small chance that someone bad might try to sneak in. But terrorists can and do find other ways to get in; banning refugees will not stop terrorism. It never has, there are far easier ways to get into the country. 9/11 was not carried out by refugees. It’s debatable whether Paris was either.

Banning refugees is exactly what Daesh (another name for ISIS that they hate) wants. If no one will rescue their victims, then nobody will dare to leave their regime. How many militants and supporters secretly wish they could leave, but know that there’s nowhere for them to go? By giving into fear, the rest of the world is strengthening the very terrorist group they’re trying to get rid of.

The thought of so many people suffering and dying when we could be helping them makes my blood boil. There isn’t much that fills me with rage, I’m not prone to anger and can take a lot of personal hurt before I get truly angry at someone, but this… This makes me wish I could force these naysayers to spend a few hours in a refugee camp to see the desperate plight of the people that they’re refusing to help. I wish I could stop everything I’m doing right now and go help there myself. I wish I could go to the border and embrace someone who’s running from terror and war, and offer to share my home with them until they can build a new life of their own. I want to sit with them, cry with them, to show them that not all people in the world want to hurt them, that there is love and compassion still in the human race. I want to give them hope.

Sometimes all the hurt in the world is a bit overwhelming. I’m a very empathetic person, so I feel others’ pain deeply and the thought of others suffering brutal atrocities like this disturbs me so much. I don’t always know what to do about it; sometimes there’s not much I can do except spread awareness of ways we can help. But even though it can be overwhelming now and then, I wouldn’t change any of it. If we can’t empathize with others, we’ll never be moved to help them or to stop our own actions when they cause harm.

Call me an idealist, or a dreamer… I don’t care. I want a world that knows peace. I want an end to war and unnecessary suffering and injustice. And we’ll never get there if we don’t fucking help each other.

If you’re able to donate to help the refugees, here’s one place to do so. If you know of any other donation sites, or of any other ways we can help Syrian refugees as well as victims of the Paris attacks and all the other attacks that have been going on in the world lately, please comment with the information. If I can’t go and help them myself, at least I can try to spread awareness for what we can do from over here. [https://donate.unhcr.ca/index_custom.php?page_id=sy…

This song has been running through my head all day. [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y96WY5Do_bs]

Starbucks Red Cups: War on Christmas?

FOX_and_Friends_First_-War_On_Christmas_Starbucks*sigh* Yet another “War on Christmas!” battle cry. This year it’s over a red cup.

Yes, let that sink in. Some Christians think they are being persecuted or that there is a war on Christmas because Starbucks chose a plain red cup this year instead of one with snowflakes or reindeer. Even though there was never an image of Jesus on past Starbucks cups, the change to a plain colored cup has caused outrage and boycotts.

Here are some reasons why this is ridiculous.

1. Starbucks is not, and never was, obligated to celebrate Christmas.

They are a business, not a church. They are not obligated to promote the specific beliefs or holiday celebrations of some or all their customers. Many companies do promote Christmas, but not because they are obligated to do so; they do it to sell you more stuff. If you didn’t buy it, they wouldn’t sell Christmas themed products. Isn’t rampant consumerism and focus on profit what’s wrong with the Christmas season anyways? For once a company is refusing to give in to this financially motivated holiday mindset, and people are attacking them for it. I applaud them for not making this season all about profits at the expense of their core values. 

2. Christmas is NOT just a Christian holiday.

465934851People of many faiths as well as atheists and agnostics celebrate various versions of Christmas that have nothing to do with Jesus. Plus, there are other winter holidays! There is Kwanzaa, Hannukah, pagan winter holidays for the Winter Solstice, etc. People have many different reasons for celebrating the winter holiday season, many of which have absolutely nothing to do with Christianity or Jesus or even religion at all. Which leads me to my next point:

3. Christmas was NOT originally a Christian holiday.

According to many Biblical scholars, Jesus was likely born in the Fall, but the Bible does not give a specific date as to his birth. Let me say that again: There is no evidence that Jesus was born on December 25th, or even in the winter season at all.

Christmas started out as a pagan celebration of the Winter Solstice, which is where most of our popular Christmas traditions come from. Much later on, Christian leaders combined their celebration of the birth of Christ with the already well established pagan winter holiday celebrations to please the people. The people could keep their pagan celebrations while adding in a dash of Christian doctrine. The combination of Christ’s birth and the Winter Solstice celebration is a prime example of Christianity taking over pagan holidays to make the public more accepting of their religion. I have met many Christians who don’t celebrate Christmas for this very reason. In times past, it was generally accepted that Christians should not celebrate Christmas because of its pagan origins. So why are some Christians upset that Christmas isn’t being promoted the way they want? It was never their holiday to begin with; it was pagan long before Jesus’ birth was added. At the very least it’s equally pagan and Christian. But many selfishly want to claim it as ONLY theirs. This is grossly unfair and ignores the very clear historical roots of this holiday. 

In summary: Starbucks can do whatever they want with their cups. It is not a slight against Christians, nor is it a “War on Christmas”. It’s simply a business opting to not promote one specific winter holiday, but instead remaining neutral and celebrating holiday cheer in general. Given the diversity of their customers in regards to beliefs and holiday celebrations, I think this was a very good call.

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Harper’s Racist Comments Regarding Refugees in Niqabs

The following was seen on Facebook:

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After receiving this in the mail yesterday, I felt moved to write this open letter to Mr. Harper. Please SHARE MY LETTER (below) if you feel that it is a Canadian value to stop judging people by their clothing, colour and religion.
______________________________________________________________
Dear Mr. Harper

After receiving your flyer in the mail today that was addressed to my family, and states that “It is offensive that someone would want to hide their identity at the very moment where they are committing to join the Canadian family”, I felt the need to write this open letter to you. I would like to take a minute to talk about family, and about community.

I write to you as a white female from the middle upper class neighbourhood of Tsawwassen BC. I want you to know that I served our great country in Afghanistan in 2009, and I believe that national security is important. I meet the typical demographics of someone that one might think would disagree with the niqab, except I that don’t. Like most Canadians I don’t actually know anyone who wears a niqab, but I would not mind having them as my neighbours, and here is why.

I believe that good citizenship is grounded in upholding the rule of law. Showing ones face at the Canadian citizenship ceremony is not a law in our country. Before the ceremony, the person is visually identified many times in the process of the application. They have already had pictures taken, and formal face to face contact with government officials. After a fully informed process of public discourse, if all Canadians agree to make a law that people have to show their face during the ceremony, fine, but make it a law and then respect the religion by adapting the ceremony in a culturally sensitive way. Right now there is no law, people are not doing anything wrong by not uncovering themselves. A policy that forces these women to uncover their faces at the citizenship ceremony will only serve to exclude them from the possibility of becoming Canadian citizens and reaching their dreams of a better life. Is that what you want Mr. Harper? To exclude vulnerable and marginalized women and children from becoming part of our Canadian family because we are not willing look beyond some clothing? Also, religious tolerance is built into the Canadian citizenship ceremony in that it is legal to bring one’s own holy book of choice to use for the Citizenship oath. If religious tolerance is a Canadian cornerstone built into our Citizenship ceremony and oath procedures, why this cognitive dissonance with the niqab?

Having studied health sciences at university, I know that immigrant women of colour, that belong to a minority religion, top the list of our most marginalized and vulnerable people. Often these women are fleeing home countries due to volatile political conditions, natural disasters, or gender inequality. They overcome the many barriers to Canadian immigration, a system that favours economic immigrants over refugees. We let very few refugees into our country compared to people from wealthy nations. These women make up a group of the most disadvantaged people on the planet, why would we refuse them an opportunity for a better life? Many of these women have children. Protecting children from the horrors of their home countries is a virtuous decision, one that Canadians like me stand behind.

Many of these women have overcome physical dangers, emotional trauma, family separation, stigmatization, the unfamiliarity of a new home and a new culture. Against all odds, they arrive un-noticed by most Canadians. In fact, they are so good at joining the ‘Canadian family’, that many reading this now were not even aware of them until you brought them up.

Have you ever see the movie Rudy, Mr. Harper? It is one of my favourites. If you have not seen it, Rudy is an inspiring true story about an underdog who stops at nothing to accomplish his dreams of playing football at Notre Dame. Like that story, everyone has told these women it is impossible to accomplish their dreams. Everyone has told them they will never have a better life. But these women have heart, and dedication. These women fight for a chance to be part of our great country and a chance for their families to have what we have, freedom and democracy. This is the epitome of courage, of what it means to have heart. The fact that they have overcome so much to arrive at the moment of their Citizenship oath affirms that these women are tenacious and resilient. Those are qualities I welcome into our Canadian family. Our great Nation was built by people who exemplified these qualities. These women are the ‘Rudy’ of our time.

Mr. Harper, your cognitive dissonance brings up a few questions for me.

Where were you on the appearance debate that occurred this summer in BC? A heated discourse on the legality of female toplessness was going on, where a police officer asked a young women to put her top back on at a public beach in Kelowna. What is the message that the CPC wants to send by picking this Niqab debate to address ‘Canadian values on appearance’? That conservative dress is forbidden, but public displays of nudity are encouraged under human rights? That does not appear to be very conservative, Mr. Harper. If the women who exercise their right to be topless don’t offend you, but those who prefer a more covered lifestyle do, what kind of message does that send? Do you have something against modesty, Mr. Harper? Are female rights only encouraged when it means we will be wearing less clothing, not more?

Every Canadian in this country has been told as a child to, “never judge a book by its cover.” Isn’t that just the opposite to what you are telling us, Mr. Harper? Do you want us to judge a book by its cover? Are you saying that this basic phrase of kindness, passed down from generations of wise parents and grandparents, is no longer a Canadian value? Do you want us to judge our neighbours character by what they wear and what colour they are? I think that people like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Gandhi would be ashamed of this digression in the fabric of Canadian culture and morality. Not judging other people by their appearance is a virtue we instill when we read to our children, when we shape the moral character of our developing young minds. As adults, should we not be leading by example on this? Encouraging people to judge their neighbours by appearance is divisive to our communities. Our communities have to stop perceiving visibility as progress towards ending discrimination. Multicultural representation will always be selectively available to us, and we need to acknowledge and extend solidarity to those who it excludes. That is what builds the foundation of a strong community.

Through generations of music, art, and literature, Canadians have expressed the idea of the eyes being the window to our souls. We have all had moments in our life where we have met someone’s eyes and learned a lot about them. These are shared quiet moments together that carry great depth and meaning. Through communication with our eyes, we have fallen in love, expressed sorrow, and excitement. We have been able to express every human emotion in our repertoire through a glance with another human being. We have all felt that. We know the power of our eyes. To me, the eyes are the most important things to see on a human being. This Canadian ideology is written in poetry, in greeting cards, in famous love stories. It creates memorable parts of iconic films. I believe in this Canadian cultural truism. This is important because it addresses a dichotomy in our Canadian beliefs in this debate. For me, the eyes are the most important part of the face. If I can see one’s eyes, I can also see their heart. This is part of why I feel the niqab still upholds a very important belief in our Canadian cultural tradition.

When I think of the characteristics of a strong community or family, I think of qualities like graciousness, engagement, generosity, and respect. I think of having neighbours that follow the rule of law, that work together on community projects, and that care about their fellow neighbours wellbeing. I have not met Ms. Zunera Ishaq, but have read about her. From what I have read in national newspapers I believe that she encompasses all of those things. She has overcome difficulties beyond what I can comprehend. Since coming to Canada a few years ago, she has since upheld all of the values that I as a Canadian born citizen view as important and virtuous.

I would be honoured to live in a community of people like Ms. Zunera Ishaq. Not only that, but I welcome any and all courageous women whose bravery and perseverance to live in a free and democratic country has brought them here. They have proven to be hard workers, good parents, supportive friends and when given the opportunity, community leaders. These are all attributes that I think could really benefit our communities and our economy here in Canada.

If someone is willing to fight that hard for freedom and democracy, I want them as my neighbour and part of our Canadian family.

Sincerely and respectfully,

Bridget Sangster

Harper does NOT represent Canadian values. I’m not even sure how he got elected in the first place. Respecting people’s personal adherence to their religious beliefs is very important and has always been a central part of Canadian law and culture. Wearing a niqab isn’t hurting anyone else, it’s not taking away someone else’s rights nor is it forcing someone else to adhere to their religion. It’s just how they personally believe they ought to dress, like how some Christians believe in not showing cleavage, some Jews wear certain clothing items to show their devotion to God, etc. They verify the woman’s identity privately before the citizenship ceremony (I believe a female official does it) so there’s no security risk either. And it does not cause significant upheaval or delay in the citizenship process; refugees coming from dramatically different cultures often have special needs such as interpreters and immigration is used to dealing with that. Plus, this isn’t exactly a time consuming or difficult request compared to some that immigration deals with.

His comments are uncalled for, racist, and he’s degrading vulnerable women refugees trying to escape bad situations in their home countries. How can we force them to choose between their religion and safety in a new country? Fortunately, the law has never stopped them or anyone else from covering themselves according to their beliefs regarding modesty. He’s just a horrible person using his political influence to verbally degrade others and incite fear of those who are different from us. But if he stays in office, he may be able to cause more damage to our immigration process than he’s already done.

For those who think that refugees and immigrants ought to give up their beliefs and culture when they enter a new country- with the exception of Native Americans/First Nations people, we’re all descended from immigrants who didn’t assimilate with the established Native cultures here. Did we ask the Irish and French and Italian immigrants to give up their cultures when they immigrated? Of course not. So why these particular people? Because people are racist and fearful of cultures they don’t understand or relate to. But that’s a shitty reason to berate and bully people.

Make sure you vote on Oct 19!!

Kim Davis: It Was Never About Religious Freedom. 

Read about it here:

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10156047682235615&id=358168880614

This situation with Kim Davis was never about her religious freedom. If it was, she wouldn’t have forbidden her deputy clerks to issue licenses. Instead, she ignored their personal convictions and ordered them to not fulfill the law either. Davis and her supporters have made it blatantly clear that their goal is not to protect her individual religious liberty, but to stop same sex marriages altogether at that office. It’s a gross abuse of her power as an elected official.

And the result of Davis’ insurrection? It’s far from harmless, unfortunately. Her clerks are being harassed and looked down upon if they dare to obey the Supreme Court and issue licenses (or God forbid follow their OWN religious beliefs), LGBTQ activists are receiving more threats and are fearful of engaging in public protests in that area, and this woman is STILL being held up as a hero when she’s really the villain.

I don’t care how many marriages she’s had, what her personal religious beliefs are, or what she does in her spare time. I’d be just as irate about her corruption if she was an atheist refusing to serve black people. If you ever hear of an atheist doing such a thing, I would oppose that person as well. The issue is not her personal beliefs, but her insisting on imposing those beliefs and opinions onto others in a manner that strips them of their legal rights and demeans them. The issue is her refusing to do her job but also refusing to resign, preventing another official who will do the whole job from being selected.

To be honest, despite her hurtful beliefs regarding LGBTQ people like me, I could have somewhat respected her if she’d voluntarily resigned. That’s a mark of a strong conscience, whether I agree with the beliefs or not, and that would not have oppressed anyone else.

She’s no martyr. She’s trying to use her government office to take away the legal rights of others, including her deputy clerks whose religious beliefs apparently don’t matter to Davis since she’s given them no choice. Her religious beliefs are the only ones that matter here, everyone else must bow to her wishes or she’ll throw a tantrum and purposefully go to jail to prove her point.

This situation needs to be talked about because it’s very dangerous. People like this sadly have a lot of support in the US, and the lies being spread in the media are causing increased harassment and hatred of the LGBTQ community. The Supreme Court is being compared to ISIS, irresponsible politicians are calling this a criminalization of Christianity, all of which just deepens the already deep cultural war over the legal rights of the LGBTQ community. And when you view your government as ISIS and LGBTQ people as militant bullies who are jailing Christians, why would these people refrain from taking the law into their own hands to push back against those who they so ironically view as their “oppressors”? Not much. Anything they do is “justified”. Hence all the threats and violence.

Yes, there are many other important issues in the world right now that also need attention. Davis is nothing compared to the refugee crisis, for example. But if we ignore religious oppression occurring in our midst, we will start losing our freedoms to these extremists just like Iran lost their freedoms to religious extremists. Have you seen photos of women there in the 70’s? They weren’t forced to wear Islamic coverings like they are today. Seriously, the Islamic revolution screwed up their country- and if we’re not careful that could one day happen here too. So we have to talk about situations like these, we have to challenge her martyr status that she doesn’t deserve, because otherwise our freedoms in the US will continue to be chipped away by religious extremists who don’t give a damn about what you believe.

‘Great Precaution Not To Offend A Minister’: Couple Denied Marriage Explains Why They Chose A Judge (link)

“We took great precaution not to offend a minister — that’s why we went to a judge to get married, never dreaming that he couldn’t follow the law,” Wilson told WTOL. “That he wouldn’t follow the law.”

“To go through that experience when it’s not pleasant and singles you out at a time in your life when you’re celebrating the fact that you have the same right as everyone else, it’s just not good. I don’t want anyone else to go through it,” she added.

But of course, the religious right will never be satisfied. Most same-sex couples who want to marry aren’t asking clergy members they don’t know to marry them, to avoid awkward situations and out of respect for their religious beliefs.

But taxpayer employees of the state have, as written above, a legal duty and sworn oath to do their jobs, “faithfully and impartially.”

How much more are same-sex couples supposed to do to appease anti-gay activists and “Christians”?

What more does the religious right want?

http://www.thenewcivilrightsmovement.com/davidbadash/_great_precaution_not_to_offend_a_minister_couple_denied_marriage_explains_why_they_chose_a_judge

So what more can we do? This couple specifically didn’t go to a church in order to not offend any clergy, and they were STILL faced with a religious person who refused to marry them, even though it was literally his job to do so.

This is the next stage of the LGBTQ movement for equality- making sure that state officials actually obey the law. State officials are NOT entitled to refuse service to anyone because of their personal beliefs- they are obligated to represent the law, not themselves, even when they personally disagree with the law. Any government official that cannot represent the law consistently should find a new profession, since they’re unable to fulfill their most basic duties which they swear to uphold.